INDEX | NORTHERN | CENTRAL | NORTHEASTERN | SOUTHEASTERN | SOUTHERN | LAKE POWELL

Northeastern Region report

Information compiled by Ron Stewart

Cleaning fish: Biologists now believe the disposal of fish parts, especially the head and skeleton, is one of the primary reasons whirling disease has spread to new waters. To avoid moving whirling disease and other undesired organisms, you should clean fish at home and send the parts to a landfill. If that isn't possible, please clean the fish and bury the parts at least 100 yards away from the water's edge. Do not move fish or fish parts from one water to another.

Waterbody Report
Big Sandwash Reservoir
2015-07-23
Fair
Fishing has been fair to good for rainbows, bass and yellow perch. The bass and yellow perch have moved into shallower water with the warmer weather, and the rainbows and browns are now in deeper water. This is the summer pattern, and fish will be most active and accessible in the early mornings and evenings.
Brough Reservoir
2015-07-23
Fair
We haven't received any reports from anglers. The reservoir is almost full. There are special catch-and-release regulations at Brough Reservoir. You must use flies and lures only — baits and scented (or salted) lures are not allowed. See the Utah Fishing Guidebook for details.
Browne Lake
2015-07-23
Fair
The last report was of fair fishing. The weather changes quickly in the Uintas, so you'll want to be prepared for possible storms.
Bullock Reservoir
2015-07-23
Fair
Anglers report fair fishing for bass and a few rainbows. The reservoir is almost full.
Calder Reservoir
2015-07-23
Fair
Anglers report fair fishing. The water level remains low. Calder has catch-and-release regulations. You must use flies and lures only — baits and scented (or salted) lures and flies are not allowed. See the Utah Fishing Guidebook for details.
Cottonwood Reservoir
2015-07-23
Fair
Anglers report fair fishing for a mix of fish, including rainbows, bass and tiger muskies. The reservoir is almost full. The statewide daily limit for tiger muskie is one fish over 40 inches; all others must be released immediately. Tiger muskies are sensitive to mishandling, so bring them in quickly, but not by horsing. Try to keep the fish from expending too much energy; keep their gills in the water as you handle them and release as quickly as possible.
Crouse Reservoir
2015-07-23
Slow
Water levels are extremely low.
Currant Creek Reservoir
2015-07-23
Fair
Anglers report slow to good fishing for tiger trout and rainbow trout. Try traditional baits (worms or artificial baits), flies, brightly colored spoons or crankbaits. If you're bottom fishing, use something to float your bait about 18–24 inches off the bottom. This will keep your worm above the mud and weeds so it's easier for the fish to find. The roads are drying out.
East Park Reservoir
2015-07-23
Fair
The fishing is spotty — good one day, and slow the next. Try trout baits (worms or artificial baits), flies, brightly colored spoons or crankbaits. If you're bottom fishing, use something to float your bait about 18–24 inches off the bottom. This will keep your worm above the mud and weeds so it's easier for the fish to find. The roads are drying out.
Flaming Gorge Reservoir
2015-07-23
Good
Fishing has been fair to hot depending on locations and species. Here's a look at each species.

Kokanee salmon: Kokanee fishing has recently slowed because of the rapidly increasing reservoir surface elevation. Flaming Gorge is currently at 6,032 feet and has been rising almost three inches a day. The surface temperature has also climbed to 66–72°F. As a result, kokanee are being caught deeper in the water column (around 40 feet down). The depth and location can change quickly, so watch the fish finder and put your lure where the fish are. Many of the recently caught kokanee have been in the 2.5- to 3-pound range. Remember, mortality rates on released fish increase as water temperatures rise, so we encourage you to keep your limits of small kokanee. A variety of lures will work, including #2 Needlefish, Rocky Mountain Tackle (RMT) Viper spoons and a variety of dodger/squid combos. Pink and orange colors are working best. Troll at around 1.6 and 2.2 miles per hour.

Rainbow trout: Fishing is red hot, and anglers are catching high-quality fish. Because of abundant cicadas in the lower reservoir, the top-water action has been exceptional. Fly anglers should tie on a cicada pattern, and spin anglers can try small top waters like the Storm Hopper Popper. Top-water fishing is a riot and very productive when fish become accustomed to looking up for food. Anglers often catch rainbows while trolling for kokanee, casting jigs (marabous, curly tails, tubes) near shore or soaking a nightcrawler or PowerBait along the bottom.

Lake trout: Fishing has been slow, but it's picking up in the Canyon region of the reservoir. Fishing for smaller lake trout has been red hot just south of Buckboard, WY. The most effective way to catch lake trout is to find concentrations along main channel points and breaks, and vertically jig with jigging spoons, tube jigs or Gulp minnows. Jiggers should try white, three-inch tube jigs tipped with a small chunk of sucker meat. Anglers can also troll with spoons, flatfish or similar crankbaits in chartreuse, white or rainbow trout colors. Most lake trout are 50–100 feet deep, but they can also be caught in shallower waters earlier or later in the day. Successful trolling speeds are around 1.6–1.8 miles per hour.

Smallmouth bass: Fishing is great! Once again, cicadas are abundant in the lower portion of the reservoir, so the top-water action has been fast. Smallmouth bass are coming off the spawn, so you can expect bass to be eagerly searching for food to build up their reserves after all that hard work. It's fun to fish for smallmouth bass because of their aggressive and opportunistic nature. Bounce 1/4-inch jigs in earth-tone colors along the bottom, pop a top water across the surface near shore or drop shot a four-inch worm in the shallows. Regardless of the method, you're likely to catch a lot of bass, along with a few bonus rainbow trout.

Burbot: Although there haven't been many reports, some anglers say the burbot fishing is good. Burbot are most abundant in the uppermost reaches of the reservoir in Wyoming, so anglers should start their search there. They are predominantly a nighttime species and prefer cooler water and rocky main channel structure. Start fishing at dusk and target depths greater than 30 feet. Use 3/8- to 1/2-ounce glow lures, like Yamamoto grubs in luminous white or Northland Buckshot spoons in glow, tipped with sucker or chub meat. Burbot are not nearly as active or aggressive during the summer months, so jig lures slowly and close to the bottom, and move if you're not catching fish.
Green River below Flaming Gorge dam
2015-07-23
Good
There are still a few cicadas around, but caddis flies are now more prevalent in the two to three miles immediately below the dam. Dry dropper rigs are working well with a cicada on top and with a scud, zebra midge or nymph below. Caddis hatches are becoming more abundant in the A-section, and some yellow sallies have been spotted as well. Terrestrials (like ants, crickets and hoppers) are a variation from the norm, which is always a good option during peak season. Spin anglers should try small marabou jigs, spoons or crankbaits in deeper water and runs. The river is currently flowing at an average of 1,700 cubic feet per second and peaking at 2,160 cubic feet per second between 2–8 p.m. You can check flows online.
Long Park Reservoir
2015-07-23
Fair
An angler recently reported good fishing near the inlet. The roads should be drying out.
Matt Warner
2015-07-23
Good
Most reports are of fair to good fishing. Try trout baits (like worms or artificial baits), flies, brightly colored spoons or crankbaits. When bottom fishing, use something to float your bait roughly 18—24 inches from the bottom. This will keep your worm above the mud and weeds and make it easier for the fish to find.
Moose Pond
2015-07-23
Good
Most reports are of good fishing, but it changes with the storms. Try trout baits (like worms or artificial baits), flies, brightly colored spoons or crankbaits. When bottom fishing, use something to float your bait roughly 18—24 inches from the bottom. This will keep your worm above the mud and weeds and make it easier for the fish to find.
Pelican Lake
2015-07-23
Good
Anglers are visiting the lake, and most report fair to excellent fishing for bass and bluegill, depending on the time of day and the storms. It is also a good time to target carp. Removal of carp by archery or fishing tackle will help the water quality, which will help the growth of the bass and bluegill. A tagged-carp contest started May 1 and will run until August 1. The tags are red and located on the left side of the dorsal fin. If you catch a tagged carp, take it to the Vernal Sportsman's Warehouse to receive a prize. Water levels still look good.
Red Fleet Reservoir
2015-07-23
Good
Fishing has been good for rainbows and bass. We are also hearing that bluegill are in the shallows and supplying some fast fishing. Fishing is slow for small walleye, although anglers occasionally catch larger fish. If you're fishing for bluegill, think small: jigs, spoons or small baits. For bass, much the same as bluegill, just larger. For trout, try baits (like worms, mealworms, salmon eggs or artificial baits), flies, brightly colored spoons, crayfish-colored jigs or fish-colored crankbaits. When bottom fishing, use a marshmallow or floating bait to float your bait roughly 18–24 inches from the bottom. This will keep your worm above the mud and weeds and make it easier for the fish to find. The water level is back to normal as a result of spring rain.
Sheep Creek Lake
2015-07-23
Fair
Fishing has been fair, and roads in the area should be dry.
Spirit Lake
2015-07-23
Good
Anglers report fair to good fishing. For trout, try baits (like worms, mealworms, salmon eggs or artificial baits), flies, brightly colored spoons, crayfish-colored jigs or fish-colored crankbaits. When bottom fishing, use a marshmallow or floating bait to float your bait roughly 18–24 inches from the bottom. This will keep your worm above the mud and weeds and make it easier for the fish to find. Spirit was restocked with catchable-sized tiger trout last summer. Tamarak and Jessen were also stocked with tiger trout. Two- to three-inch fingerlings were flown into these upper lakes in 2013, so they should now be reaching catchable sizes.
Starvation Reservoir
2015-07-23
Fair
Anglers report fair to good fishing for rainbows, bass and walleye. The hot weather has moved the trout into a summer pattern, so you'll find the best fishing in the cooler hours. Baits have been working well, especially from the shore. Try smaller, deep-diving crankbaits and spoons for rainbows and a larger presentation for walleye and bass. For walleye, keep it on the bottom or cast deep into the rocks. Most of the walleye are small or in the 20- to 23-inch range, and you can help the fishery by taking them home. The reservoir is full.
Steinaker Reservoir
2015-07-23
Good
Anglers report fair to good fishing for rainbows, bass and bluegill, whether they're fishing from shore or in boats. Worms and artificial baits are working well from shore, while crankbaits, brightly colored spoons and crayfish-colored jigs are producing for shore anglers and boaters. The fish can be anywhere from the surface to depths of about 30 to 40 feet. The hot weather has initiated a summer pattern where the trout move deeper and are mostly active in the cooler hours (early mornings and evenings). The water level has risen but it's still low enough to expose rocks and sandbars.

 

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