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A little owl makes a big journey

A little owl makes a big journey

One of our PTT-equipped owls managed to evade prairie falcons, badgers and weasels and began her fall journey southward from Cisco, Utah on October 3. On October 8, she was on the edge of Grand Gulch in San Juan County, and by October 14, she’d found her way to…


Mapping the Tushar mountain streams

Mapping the Tushar mountain streams

The over-arching goal of the research is to restore native fish species, including Bonneville cutthroat trout, to fire-affected streams in the Tushar Mountains. However, the watersheds of these remote 12,000+ foot peaks do not provide data easily.


8 New Year’s resolutions for anglers

8 New Year’s resolutions for anglers

Keeping the fish you catch — up to your legal limit — is the key to providing fish with the food they need to grow. So keep your catch and cook it up for the fam!


Hunting ethics

Hunting ethics

Either hunter could have legally shot at the bird but both declined. I was impressed with the good judgment and courtesy the father and son team exhibited even though they had no idea I was watching.


The Twitchell Canyon Fire

The Twitchell Canyon Fire

When I first visited the burned area it looked like a bulldozer had gone down the middle of the stream. It was completely full of gravel. There were no fish. There were no pools. This was my first taste of what we were dealing with.


Wings beat and roosters flew

Wings beat and roosters flew

At the end of the day, as we walked back to the truck, a rooster flushed. Having played guide that day, I was the only one in our group who hadn’t gotten my limit. This one was mine. The rooster came down the draw towards and past me. I fired once, twice, then I fired my last shell. On the third shot the rooster folded.


White-nose syndrome: a disease of bats

White-nose syndrome: a disease of bats

Bats are interesting and largely beneficial animals that provide important “ecosystem services.” That is a fancy way of saying they eat lots of harmful bugs for free. They can eat half of their weight in forest and crop pests every night.


Restoring a historic dam for anglers and farmers

Restoring a historic dam for anglers and farmers

DWR stocks 12,000 rainbow trout and 5,000 tiger trout every year into Red Creek Reservoir. The rainbows are stocked in mid-June and the tigers in early July. Red Creek Reservoir can actually yield some pretty impressive growth, and the condition of the fish has been good.


Are you catching and releasing properly?

Are you catching and releasing properly?

Newer research has shown an additional factor: water and air temperatures play a big part in fish survival. Fish, especially cold-water fish like trout, are more likely to die when they are caught and brought up into warm summer waters.


Trout vs. chub

Trout vs. chub

The main questions for fisheries managers are whether or not the growing population of chub will compete with sport fish for food and/or space, as has been observed elsewhere, or whether chub can be effectively controlled by trout populations.


Stay Low. Stay Still. Survive.

Stay Low. Stay Still. Survive.

The mulie bounded across the road in front of us. Powerful leg muscles flexed under her summer coat, propelling her through effortless 20-foot arcs. Five heads swiveled to watch the deer, some of them lurching from reclined positions of slumber.


Tagging toads at night

Tagging toads at night

Boreal toads are more active at night, so we’ll be surveying breeding sites after dark using headlamps. Food and sleeping arrangements at one of our remote cabins in west Box Elder County will be provided! The work typically does not end until after midnight.