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Blog posts from the Fishing

The familiar tug of a hooked fish

The familiar tug of a hooked fish

I felt the solid hit and pull of a fish after setting the hook. I played him with my reel and he was large enough to take some line as he made his runs in his effort to escape. Within a few minutes, I had him to the boat. After a quick photo op, I released him. I felt great — I’d just landed my first fish of the season.


Staying warm and catching fish with friends

Staying warm and catching fish with friends

When you think about ice fishing from now on, you can think about great fishing and good times with friends. Better yet, don’t think about it! Go out and do some ice fishing of your own. You may find it’s warmer, faster and more fun than you ever thought.


The magic of autumn in Utah

The magic of autumn in Utah

The day was gorgeous, the weather was great, the scenery was interesting and colorful and there were plenty of deer for us to watch through binoculars. Fortunately, it’s a big area and we were able to find some wildlife close enough to photograph.


Flashy fish and aspen leaves

Flashy fish and aspen leaves

The day was amazingly perfect. At one point, the wind picked up and aspen leaves fell in the stream where about a dozen browns came to hang out. It was magical. This trip was a reminder that I need to get out and fly fish more: I could use the practice and the fresh air.


Fly rods: not just for trout anymore

Fly rods: not just for trout anymore

I love fishing the streams and lakes in Utah because of the diversity of trout species. Until a few years ago, I was completely content fishing for trout, but I began to realize that there were many other cool and warm water fish species in Utah.


Forty fish in two hours

Forty fish in two hours

I snuck away from the group to go fishing on a small stream. Not knowing what to expect, I grabbed a little fly from my tackle box, needle nose pliers and my fishing pole. I threw the little beadhead nymph into the stream and immediately felt the strong vibration of a small fish.


Lower lip bites and eyes full of wonder

Lower lip bites and eyes full of wonder

Next cast… score! You know what I mean if you’ve ever seen someone holding a fishing pole get a bite that bends the pole. I still remember their lower lip bites and looks of concentration and wonder as they worked to reel in that big fish.


Spring fishing fever

Spring fishing fever

There is something about spring ice-off fishing that I can’t quite describe. The aggressive fish, the methodical rhythm of casting and the wide variety of angling opportunities — in short, it’s just awesome.


Utah’s most-viewed fishing spots

Utah’s most-viewed fishing spots

One of the perks of working in the Communications section at DWR is that I have quick access to things like web statistics. (If you’re nerdy like me, those sorts of things excite you.) We recently checked the traffic on the fishing portion of the DWR website. In order from least to most page views, here are the 15 Utah waterbodies you were most curious about.


Ice fishing with a biologist and a news reporter

Ice fishing with a biologist and a news reporter

For about a half hour, Phil and I were treated to a non-stop photo opp as Calvin yanked trout through the ice. Most of these trout ranged from 14­­–16 inches. Except for one Bear Lake cutthroat, all of the fish were splake. All of the fish were well proportioned. Not fat, not skinny. Just right.


Ice fishing in southeastern Utah

Ice fishing in southeastern Utah

In Utah we’re lucky enough to have a long and consistent ice fishing season on most of our favorite waters. I’ve always been a quality over quantity guy, so I’ll share my favorite spots in the southeastern part of the state.


Crawling along the riverbanks

Crawling along the riverbanks

Fishing for brown trout in the Ogden River can be fantastic. Average fish densities can reach upwards of 6,000 fish per mile of stream. Yes, you read that right: there are tons of fish in the Ogden River.