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Utah DWR video

Beavers in Utah

See more Utah DWR videos

Water for wildlife

Water for wildlife

The UDWR is currently aware of almost 900 guzzlers throughout the state. The exact locations of these guzzlers are not published in order to provide some protection to the animals that use them, but general locations of the guzzlers are shown in this map.

Fish are hungry, active and concentrated

Fish are hungry, active and concentrated

Many fish lose weight during the winter months and when ice off occurs, they’re hungry and eager to put the lost weight back on. What this means for anglers is that during ice off, fish are hungry, active, concentrated and willing to take almost anything you throw.

So you want to be a wildlife biologist?

So you want to be a wildlife biologist?

Many DWR biologists (including me!) started off as university students working on projects funded by the DWR, and that led them to a career with the agency. It’s a great path if you are truly serious about becoming a professional biologist.

Connections between habitats

Connections between habitats

We put together a web map that shows where some of these wildlife crossing structures are located within Utah.

Pelicans at Strawberry Reservoir: what do they eat?

Pelicans at Strawberry Reservoir: what do they eat?

The growing number of pelicans caught the attention of managers and anglers. “They’re eating all the trout,” was the concern. In response, we teamed up with and Utah State University and began tracking the eating habits of the birds.

How to see a nocturnal migration

How to see a nocturnal migration

MANY PEOPLE ENJOY birding activities during the fall migration period in Utah. Songbirds, hawks, waterbirds and waterfowl travel through the state, especially the areas near the Great Salt Lake and its wetlands. Whether you drop everything to find a rare bird that’s been sighted, wake up early to sit in a duck blind or simply […]

Top 5 reasons to hunt upland game in Utah

Top 5 reasons to hunt upland game in Utah

No matter where you live in Utah, there’s upland game nearby. You can hunt in the Mojave Desert for quail, the alpine habitats of the Uinta Mountains for ptarmigan, the agriculture fields for pheasants, the beautiful yellow and red grandeur of the Wasatch Front for ruffed grouse. Diversity is the spice of life.

Chasing owls in Utah’s west desert

Chasing owls in Utah’s west desert

Last week, I had a delightful experience that made me giddier than my wedding day. I was invited to join biologists and researchers as they banded burrowing owlets. Tiny, downy, newly hatched baby owls? Count me in!

Mapping the Tushar mountain streams

Mapping the Tushar mountain streams

The over-arching goal of the research is to restore native fish species, including Bonneville cutthroat trout, to fire-affected streams in the Tushar Mountains. However, the watersheds of these remote 12,000+ foot peaks do not provide data easily.

Masters of the mountain

Masters of the mountain

I am still amazed at the acrobatic nature of mountain goats. You can see them jumping from rock to rock, climbing up the slick, steep cliffs without a problem. It’s of little wonder that predators don’t target them very often.

You’ll earn this dinner

You’ll earn this dinner

About five minutes later, Gauge’s tail helicoptered again. A lone chukar flushed in front of me, headed straight away; I pulled my gun up and shot once just as the bird was about to disappear behind the ridgeline. The bird crumbled in midair and fell out of sight.

Flashy fish and aspen leaves

Flashy fish and aspen leaves

The day was amazingly perfect. At one point, the wind picked up and aspen leaves fell in the stream where about a dozen browns came to hang out. It was magical. This trip was a reminder that I need to get out and fly fish more: I could use the practice and the fresh air.